Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Discussing Strike Combinations
Justin Todd
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Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2016 8:15 pm

Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Justin Todd » Thu Nov 17, 2016 8:50 pm

So I have been working on these strike sequences (not sure what to officially call them) Matt has posted to tumblr.

We have the Entering to Rushing and the the Shifting attacks, both of these helped me understand the Rooster Entering Windmill palm so I have been focusing on all 3. Here I would like to discuss the two sequences and hear some ideas and suggestions you have.

For the Entering to Rushing sequence I have been trying to understand the grinding shifting movement. It can be weird to do this double repeated motion with the striking arm and figure out where or how the power is in the grinding strike. I do feel how the grinding strike sets up the rushing strike but it also feels that there is a lot of movement and I want to make that efficient. As well, when you strike with first entering strike and then go grasp the arm, for instance starting with the left wipe, enter strike, and grasp the opponents arm from the right arm with the left arm, you are not really moving the right arm but depending on the back step to get the left arm to a place to grasp it?

In the Shifting attack sequence, I am trying to make the first shifting attack clean and remembering the down to up transforming movement as well as the rhythm of the two arms with the main arm doing the bulk of the power and the following arm picking up the pieces. The trickiest part for me is the transition from the first plunge to the head that is blocked into 'transforming, backstop, grasping the arm' movement and trying to find the correct timing, sometimes I feel my grasp is coming to late.

http://ysb-beijing.tumblr.com/post/1498 ... -used-as-a


Here is my first attempt at discussing YSB online with words. I'm sure it will evolve to be more concise. Any suggestions are welcome. I will post the Windmill Entering palm and discuss that as well. Thanks

Justin Todd
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Joined: Thu Nov 17, 2016 8:15 pm

Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Justin Todd » Thu Nov 17, 2016 8:54 pm

On the back step in the Shifting attacks sequence I have worked on going low in a 3 step fashion. I slows the whole thing down a little but builds strength and coordination. (Not sure if that is correct)

Also, I was wondering if it is possible to add the full blown rooster lying step into these?

Blade Sackett
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Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2016 10:07 am

Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Blade Sackett » Sat Nov 19, 2016 1:32 am

Hey Justin, I actually wrote about these strike combinations on facebook recently and how important it is to practice applications to further your individual practice. This was also my first time expressing my training on paper so I hope it's comprehendible and applicable to your questions....

Thank you Matt Bild and Erick Col for a great session of application training. This reminded me how important applications are, not only for your fighting skill, but also for your individual practice. We worked mostly on Shifting techniques, with a focus on "listening" skills like transforming and removing. Matt brought up a great point about how we can win most fights using our strength, footwork, and being aggressive, but if we ever run into a skilled fighter or someone that is much stronger, it's going to be our ability to listen to the opponent's force, react, and change that will insure victory. This is the true "art" in our martial art. We also emphasized breaking down the combinations and going through each one slowly to help memory retention. This was difficult for me, especially trying to shift the center of gravity on guys as massive as Matt and Erick, but with correct technique I was able to apply these strikes.

1. Whirl Shift
2. Whirl Shift, Enter strike head, transform and back step, Close-in Shift
3. Wipe strike, Lying Enter, Lying Enter Dodging
4. Advance around opponent and Whirl Shift to open then Wipe strike, transform and backstep into Lying Enter to ribs, Enter strike head


First off, with the Whirl Shift, I found myself searching for the opponent's arm rather than striking toward the head and baiting them into a block. This also insured that the point of contact was made at the forearm instead of the hand, creating better leverage to first rotate the opponent's center slightly backwards with the initial contact, and then while the opponent is naturally adjusting forward, continuing through with the Whirl strike pulling the opponent off center.

As for the transforming, I was having a similar problem. After the opponent blocks the Entering strike to the head, I was just trying to remove their force which made it difficult for my support hand to smoothly come up from under my arm to grasp the opponent's arm. So, after the Enter strike is blocked, I needed to threaten the opponent's face with a grinding palm strike before I transformed causing the opponent to give me more of his force, and then easily making the handoff to then apply the Close-in Shift from there.

For the Lying Enter and Lying Enter Dodging, our focus was on body movement, to really dodge out of the way. I had to be careful though of going too deep into the lying stance, and clearing the opponent's arm too far out. My Wipe strike was good, as long as I extended it, really going for the opponent's jaw to cause that reaction, and then threatening the face after the block to be able to cleanly remove the opponent's arm with my support arm. But then I found myself losing the opponent's arm after I cleared it, and I had nowhere to go. I had to keep everything much tighter. I had to dodge out of the way, but not too deep as to not be able to maneuver into the next strike. And I had to keep contact with my support arm in order to keep his arm at bay, and be ready to strike.

The last combination is really just putting 2 and 3 together, so not many notes on that. Although, I will say that I love that initial advance around the opponent with the Whirl Shift into Wipe strike, and I would recommend practicing the footwork often. In your individual practice, you should be advancing around 270 degrees.

Also, there's a really sweet Shift into Lying Rushing strike after the Close-in Shift in combination 2 that we didn't get to. You can see a great demonstration of this at Matt's YSB Tumbler page.

These were my personal notes and the things that I will be improving upon, I hope there was something that can benefit you as well. Keep training, and train hard!

Blade Sackett
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Joined: Fri Nov 18, 2016 10:07 am

Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Blade Sackett » Sat Nov 19, 2016 1:38 am

So, the main point for you is to make sure you are threatening your opponent's face or head to create a reaction which you can then remove their force.
As for the deep lying step, it's great for development but created a few problems for me during applications as you can see from the notes.
Great questions and keep training Justin!

Justin Todd
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Justin Todd » Sat Nov 26, 2016 2:25 am

Thanks Blade.

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Rand
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Rand » Thu Dec 08, 2016 8:05 am

Ditto on Blade's statement on application of the first technique. Do it hard, fast and with the intent of striking the head. If they don't block it... Great! You've just landed a powerful blow, but if they do then your mechanics are proper to continue on with the rest of the techniques. I know for the longest time I was doing the first strike (not only on this drill but the majority) with the thought of ONLY contacting the opponents forearm. That isn't realistic and will cause you to fail on the street... When you really need it to work. First strike is thrown with the intent to land it! Always a good thing to consider with your training.

I really try to focus on whatever multi strike drill I'm doing, to throw the strikes with the intent of actually making solid, fight stopping contact. You won't know the skill level of your opponent and so what he's a puss and the first strike lands. You've smashed the guy with a hard strike... That's a positive in my book. The other follow-on techniques are trained for when the first strike is blocked or otherwise evaded. Don't be in a hurry to get thru each one to the last technique. Do all of them with intent to strike. (I know some in this particular sequence are to throw off their balance, but you hopefully get the picture). Hope that helps or adds to the discussion anyway.
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ingmar
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby ingmar » Fri Dec 09, 2016 5:06 pm

As a Phoenix practitioner it is interesting to read this Rooster strike thread because the same principles and training short-comings apply in Phoenix (and probably YSB in general). We tend to under-power the entering moves and over-emphasize sensitivity / change at the first blocking contact so that we can continue with our 'planned' three strike combination. Don always says "if they don't block the first one then hit them with it" but we never put the full intention and power in the first strike (when training) because... well, we are friends and don't want to injure each other :).
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Preparing for War - Finding Peace
Endless Flow - Crushing Force
Step by Step - The Perfect Circle

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Rand
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Rand » Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:12 am

Your training partners should become well-versed at blocking. Soft ass blocks don't cut it! Throwing even low power blows to the head will force your training partner to block properly. The key is that they must be of the distance to actually strike if it isn't blocked.

The biggest problem is distance! If you're just striking at the opponents arm, rather than their head, then your position for the follow-on techniques is off. Probably ain't going to work very well and you'll struggle through it when working the application because of this lack of attention to proper distance.

You don't have to strike full blast to the head on the first technique, but be conscious of getting close enough to your opponent (aka training partner) that your distance is correct.

In our Study Group, we kinda start at half speed with about half power. We also will drill multi-technique drills using their individual movements and then, after they are being performed correctly, start combining them. Techniques 1 and 2 (drill them) then 1,2 and 3 (and drill them), so on and so on. I've found that the group members tend to start fucking up when they approach a multi-technique drill as a whole. It is better to break it down into its individual elements and then strive to connect them together... Or so I've found.
Last edited by Rand on Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Rand
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby Rand » Sat Dec 10, 2016 2:24 am

Additionally, the speed and power level of the first strike will increase as you (and your training partner) become accustomed to the technique. Your distance, speed, power and intent will improve. Your training partner will become better at recognizing an actual attack that is more street realistic AND their blocking ability will improve. It's a win-win.

YSB is for fighting! Train realistically, but not with abandon. Focus on the technical details of the technique, add speed and power as you feel more confident (and your training partner becomes more confident with their blocking too). Communicate with your training partner before you increase. Don't go from 50% to 110%! Slowly inch it up.
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ingmar
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Re: Rooster entering and shifting strike sequences

Postby ingmar » Sat Dec 10, 2016 6:50 pm

Thanks for the replies Rand! You use the singular 'training partner' - does that imply that in your practice you have one particular individual that matches your intensity and you two work through the spectrum of intensity and intention together? I understand the value of multiple partners with different body sizes and fighting characteristics but it's seems hard to find that one partner, let alone many who are ready to go through the rigor of intense training.
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Preparing for War - Finding Peace
Endless Flow - Crushing Force
Step by Step - The Perfect Circle


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